24. Law student. Writer. TV/Movie/Comic Book junkie.

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Reblogged from americachavez  39,687 notes

It’s important for little girls to know not every story has to be a love story and for boys to know that soldiers aren’t the only ones to triumph in war. By Guilermo Del Toro - How Pacific Rim saved his life

“I wanted to show that men and women can be friends without having a relationship,” says del Toro of the relationship between the two main characters Mako (played by Japanese actress Rinko Kikuchi) and Raleigh (“Sons of Anarchy” star Charlie Hunnam). “Theirs is a story about partnership, equality and a strong bond between partners. It’s important for little girls to know not every story has to be a love story and for boys to know that soldiers aren’t the only ones to triumph in war.”

Nice article, worth a read. (via imraardeen)

Reblogged from racebending  19,101 notes

“If you really believe that representation doesn’t matter, then why the fuck are you threatened by it? If not seeing yourself depicted in stories has no negative psychological impact - if the breakdown of who we see on screen has no bearing on wider social issues - then what would it matter if nine stories out of ten were suddenly all about queer brown women? No big, right? It wouldn’t change anything important; just a few superficial details. Because YOU can identify with ANYONE.

So I guess the problem is that you just don’t want to. Because deep down, you think it’ll make stories worse. And why is that? Oh, yeah: because it means they wouldn’t all be about YOU.”

By fozmeadows (via kawaii-afro-fluff)

Reblogged from fuckyeahblackwidow  35,324 notes

comicsriot:

Okay, it’s my turn to do one of those classic Tumblr posts where I reblog somebody else’s movie gifs and add a, “let’s talk about this scene, though.”

Let’s talk about this scene, though. This little exchange about the bikini is one of the moments that stuck with me the most from The Winter Soldier, in terms of characterizing Natasha, as well as Steve’s relationship with her.

So we learn that Natasha has a small but grisly-looking bullet scar on her abdomen. She points out that it keeps her from wearing a bikini.

What Steve hears her say is that she’s self-conscious about how she’d look in a bikini because of a scar. So his reaction is basically to say, “Whatever, girl. You still look great.” He’s not even flirting, he’s just saying, “That’s ridiculous.”

But he’s hearing her wrong. It’s not that Natasha doesn’t wear bikinis because she’s embarrassed by her scar, or self-conscious of its ugliness. Natasha doesn’t wear bikinis because she doesn’t want anyone around the pool or at the beach to know that she’s the sort of person who acquires bullet scars.

Think about it: Whether it’s an undercover mission or R&R, any situation where the Black Widow wears a swimsuit is going to be one in which she prefers everyone to see her as just some anonymous hot girl. Because if somebody else is around with the same training she has, they’re going to be scanning the area for anyone who looks dangerous. And part of Natasha’s job- part of what keeps Natasha alive- is not showing up on their radar.

I like to think that later Steve put this together, or she explained it to him. RIght now, though, they have more pressing concerns, like Steve’s one-armed ex-boyfriend who put the scar there in the first place.

Reblogged from kateordie  678 notes
Just saying your response to that comment was bitchy, if they said hey you look like a good fuck or let's do anal yea that's creepy, but you look like someone who would be nice to cuddly with, kinda sweet.

kateordie:

Yeah, it is “bitchy,” I guess. But a comment from a complete stranger about how they want to cuddle and kiss me - BUT NOT SEXUALLY, as if that’s a thing - is creepy, unwarranted and unwelcome. I responded to it publicly, as I do from time to time, to remind the general public that that shit does not fly with me. I usually just delete those messages, and I get a surprising number of them for someone who has anonymous comments turned off.

Maybe I’m “bitchy,” but it’s a hell of a lot better than acting like being fifty shades of creepy is a compliment.

Reblogged from racebending  50,304 notes

shoorm:

edit: Ricardo Montalban, the actor who originally portrayed Khan, is Mexican, yes. The character, however, is Asian (specifically Sikh). I apologize for not making the actor/character difference clear, and I do agree it was my bad for putting Khan in this post, since POC are not interchangeable. I wanted to show how a TV show in the 60’s cast a POC for a POC, while a Hollywood blockbuster made in 2013 cast a white actor for a POC. Apologies for not explaining the Khan issue further.